St Wilfrid, Kirkby Knowle North Yorkshire

Built in 1873 by G. Fowler Jones for a cost of £1,300. Very traditional with its tower over the porch, housing three bells and plenty of birds’ nests. The bells are marked “John Taylor & Co. Founders. 1874.”

The remains of a find old boundary cross stands in the church- yard. Other sources say it is the stump of a pre-conquest cross.

Just inside the door is the top cover of the tomb of a cleric dating from the 12th century. The organ, a fine pipe model with tracker action, is in what is supposed to be the remains of a 13th century chancel arch from the original church. A 17th century font is in the churchyard but its original base remains in the church.

St Wilfrid, Kirkby KnowleIts real gem is hidden: the Tudor cup and cover are dated 1570 and remain in use - testimony to a long tradition of worship in the ‘village.

The parish now includes Upsall, but Kirkby Knowle Castle used to stand on the site of New Building, or Newbiggin as it is called. The old village mill and pond were behind the church under the eye of the old castle. With a tower instead of the usual bellcote that villages of this size usually have, Kirkby Knowle gives the impression of having dominated the landscape for as long as a church has actually stood there. Previously the parish was joined with Bagby before Upsall was included.

The West and East windows were designed and executed by Charles Kempe, for the Hotham family at Newbiggin, and his device of a wheatsheaf can be seen in the lower left corner of the West window, 1898. He also did the windows at Malvern College chapel and there is a Kempe Society. West window = Annunciation. East window = Crucifixion

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